The Missing Links: Russia's Secret Diamond Stockpile

News From the Springfield Precincts
The election is still several weeks away, but at least we know how Homer voted:

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My Favorite Phrase of the Week: Diamond-Filled Asteroid Crater
The Russians may have a secret diamond source that contains TRILLIONS of carats worth of dazzle.

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The Nutritional Value of Last Meals
Earlier this week, Matt Soniak served up the interesting tale of a condemned inmate that tried to eat his way out of the electric chair back in the 50s, partly by bulking up with a super-large last meal. Just today I came across this research abstract on the meals of executed prisoners, which states:

The average last meal is calorically rich (2,756 calories) and proportionally averages 2.5 times the daily recommended servings of protein and fat.

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Don’t Mess With the CIA
You’d think that people who worked for the CIA would know this best of all.

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Don’t Like Hipsters?
Avoid these places.

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My Adolescent Self Thinks Nolan Bushnell Is A Great Man
He created Chuck E. Cheese’s AND the Atari.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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