The Late Movies: Erupting Volcanoes

On this date 6 years ago, Alaska's Fourpeaked Mountain erupted (at left), its first eruption in at least 10,000 years. Fourpeaked had been dormant for so long that many geologists believed it to be extinct. To mark the anniversary of Fourpeaked Mountain's re-entry into the active volcano category, tonight we present a variety of videos showing the eruptions of volcanoes around the world.

Vanuatu

Marum Volcano (Ambrym Island)

Geoff Mackley, a high-risk photographer/filmmaker, and his team rappelled 500 meters down into the volcano, to the edge of a lake of boiling lava

United States

K?lauea (Hawaii)

Lava from K?lauea flows into the Pacific Ocean

Mount St. Helens (Washington)

Mount St. Helens (Washington)

NASA Landsat images of the scale of the eruption and the beginning of reclamation in the Mt. St. Helens blast zone from 1979 through 2011. (More information available from NASA.)

The Samoas

West Mata Volcano

Captured on video by NOAA and presented by Discovery News

Japan

Sarychev Volcano

Viewed from the International Space Station

Italy

Mount Etna

Includes an ash eruption and a small "twister" at the South East Crater, strombolian activity at the South East Crater, the fracture and hornito in 2800 m altitude, and the lava flow into Valle del Bove on the west flank

Indonesia

Mt. Kerapi

Shot from a hotel window in Yogjakarta, Java

Anak Krakatau

Filmed from a boat approximately one mile from the volcano

Iceland

Grimsvotn

Fimmvörðuháls

Eyjafjallajökull

Shot from 25 meters away, standing on a mount of semi-cooled lava

Eyjafjallajökull

Filmed May 1-2, 2010, after the lightning and lava of the first eruption

Bonus Video: "Eyjafjallajökull - You're doing it wrong!"

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Have you ever seen a volcano eruption in person? Let us know in the comments!

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Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
How a Hairdresser Found a Way to Fight Oil Spills With Hair Clippings
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images

The Exxon Valdez oil tanker made global news in 1989 when it dumped millions of gallons of crude oil into the waters off Alaska's coast. As experts were figuring out the best ways to handle the ecological disaster, a hairdresser from Alabama named Phil McCroy was tinkering with ideas of his own. His solution, a stocking stuffed with hair clippings, was an early version of a clean-up method that's used at real oil spill sites today, according to Vox.

Hair booms are sock-like tubes stuffed with recycled hair, fur, and wool clippings. Hair naturally soaks up oil; most of the time it's sebum, an oil secreted from our sebaceous glands, but it will attract crude oil as well. When hair booms are dragged through waters slicked with oil, they sop up all of that pollution in a way that's gentle on the environment.

The same properties that make hair a great clean-up tool at spills are also what make animals vulnerable. Marine life that depends on clean fur to stay warm can die if their coats are stained with oil that's hard to wash off. Footage of an otter covered in oil was actually what inspired Phil McCroy to come up with his hair-based invention.

Check out the full story from Vox in the video below.

[h/t Vox]

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Huntsman Marine Science Centre
Fisherman Catches Rare 'Cotton Candy' Lobster, Donates It to Aquarium
Huntsman Marine Science Centre
Huntsman Marine Science Centre

Lucky, a cotton candy-colored lobster, has been turning heads ever since he was caught off the coast of Canada's Grand Manan Island last month. As The Dodo reports, the rare blue-pink crustacean has since been donated to the Huntsman Marine Science Centre in New Brunswick, where he continues to dazzle visitors.

#guardian2011 #evolutionfisheries #rainbowlobster #rarestoftherare

A post shared by Robinson Russell (@robinsonfrankrussell) on

"If all of this attention is making Lucky blush, exactly what color would he turn?" the Marine Centre wrote in a Facebook post about Lucky's newfound fame.

Robinson Russell, the fisherman who caught the crustacean and donated it to the aquarium, said, "I have been fishing for over 20 years and it’s the first one I’ve ever seen of that color."

Researchers with the Lobster Institute at the University of Maine told The Dodo that a lobster of Lucky's pigmentation is roughly one in 100 million, making it just as rare as an albino lobster. By another estimate, lobsters like Lucky turn up once every four to five years.

Researchers says the coloring is caused by a genetic mutation that affects pigments in the lobster's shell. Most lobsters tend to be gray or brown—turning red only when boiled—but yellow, bright orange, and blue lobsters have all been spotted in the past.

Check out National Geographic's video below to see Lucky on the move. 

[h/t The Dodo]

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