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The Weird Week in Review

Frankenfossil in Custody Battle

In a complicated court case, Eric Prokopi imported the bones of a Tyrannosaurus bataar to the U.S. and told customs officials it was worth $19,000. He later sold the reconstructed skeleton at auction for over a million dollars. Then officials from Mongolia claimed that Prokopi took the fossils from the country illegally. The U.S. government seized the fossils on behalf of Mongolia. Prokopi says that the bones were not only brought over in several different batches (explaining the "value"), but that the bones in the reconstructed display are from several different dinosaurs instead of a single specimen. The next hearing in the case will be in December.

Theft Leads to Potato Spill

A thief hijacked a truck carrying 13 tons of potatoes at a farm in Essleben, Germany. However, he neglected to make sure the back door was closed securely before he took off.

"He was pretty easy to follow because he left this huge trail of potatoes behind him," explained one farm hand.

The hapless crook eventually fled empty handed when the trailer overturned, bursting one of the tractor's rear tyres causing it to crash into an electricity pylon.

Emu Underpass Canceled Due to Stupidity

When highways are built in Australia, bridges and underpasses are often designed to help koalas, reptiles, and possums cross safely. Such a plan was hatched to help emus use their territory when a new highway is built in New South Wales. Environmentalists objected to the road, which would cut through a coastal emu habitat and possibly wipe out the local population of the big birds. When highway officials offered to build underground tunnels for the emus to use, environmentalists nixed the idea, because unlike other Australian species, emus lack the intelligence to learn how to use the crossings. An environmental assessment of the planned road is expected later this year.

How to Tell the Quads Apart

Tan Chaoyun is the mother of identical quadruplet boys. The six-year-olds are starting school, and teachers at the local primary school in China are concerned over how to tell the four boys apart. So, Tan ordered them all different haircuts. The barber shaved their heads, leaving a small patch on each boy's head in the shape of the numbers one, two, three, and four! The numbers will help at home, too, because even the quads' father has a hard time telling which son is which.

Bank Robber Trapped in Bank

An unnamed man found that crime doesn't pay when he was trapped after an attempted bank robbery. An employee flipped a switch as the 27-year-old suspect tried to leave the bank in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania. The remote lock trapped him in the bank's double-door entry. He pounded on the glass until he left blood stains. But he had been warned.

Had the robber taken a closer look as he went inside, he would have seen a notice in green letters on the front door: "Enter one adult at a time. This ACU door is a protection against robberies."

Another sign higher up on the front glass says, "WARNING This property is protected against robberies by an access control unit."

After the police arrived, the man was taken to the hospital, then to the local jail.

Shooting Deaths Highlight Family Ties

A second victim has died in a shooting in Bandon, Oregon. Timothy Henson is accused in the deaths of Milton Leach and George Micheaux. The three had all lived together with two women in Myrtle Creek. Here's how they are related:

Ruth Micheaux, born 1965, was married to victim George Micheaux, born in 1993. The other victim, Leach, born in 1942, was Ruth Micheaux’s ex-husband. Ruth Micheaux is the mother of Vallena Tuell, born in 1981. Tuell is married to the suspect, Henson, born in 1969.

Besides murder, Henson faces kidnapping and assault charges for wounding Tuell.

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Little Baby's Ice Cream
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Food
Pizza and Cricket Cake Are Just Some of the Odd Flavors You'll Find at This Philadelphia Ice Cream Shop
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Little Baby's Ice Cream

Ice cream flavors can get pretty out-there, thanks to the growing number of creative scoop shops willing to take risks and broaden their customers’ horizons beyond chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry. Intrepid foodies can cool off with frozen treats that taste like horseradish, foie gras, and avocado, while Philadelphia's Little Baby’s Ice Cream is pushing the boundaries of taste with chilly offerings like everything bagel, Maryland BBQ, ranch, and cricket cake.

Cricket-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

Everything Bagel-flavored ice cream, created by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

As Lonely Planet News reports, Little Baby’s Ice Cream launched its first signature “oddball” ice cream—Earl Grey sriracha—in 2011. Since then, its rotating menu has only gotten quirkier. In addition to the aforementioned flavors, customers who swing by Little Baby’s this summer can even try pizza ice cream.

The store created the savory flavor in 2011, to celebrate neighborhood eatery Pizza Brain’s inclusion into Guinness World Records for its vast collection of pizza memorabilia. The savory, Italian-esque snack is made from ingredients like tomato, basil, oregano, salt, and garlic—and yes, it actually tastes like pizza, Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine told Lonely Planet News.

Pizza-flavored ice cream, made by Philadelphia-based Little Baby's Ice Cream
Little Baby's Ice Cream

“Frequently, folks will see it on the menu and be incredulous, then be convinced to taste it, giggle, talk about how surprised they are that it really tastes just like pizza … and then order something else,” Angevine said. “That’s just fine. Just as often though, they’ll end up getting a pizza milkshake!”

Little Baby’s flagship location is in Philadelphia's East Kensington neighborhood, but customers can also sample their unconventional goods at additional outposts in West Philadelphia, Baltimore, and a pop-up stand in Washington, D.C.’s Union Market. Just make sure to bring along a sense of adventure, and to leave your preconceived notions of what ice cream should taste like at home.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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iStock
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travel
Nalcrest, Florida: Where Postal Workers Go to Retire
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iStock

You could say that the Nalcrest community in central Florida delivers affordable retirement housing for seniors. And with amenities like a pool and tennis courts, you might even say it has the whole package [PDF]. Or you could just go with the pun that the community itself has landed on: “Nalcrest: A First Class Community.”

Nalcrest, you see, is a retirement community exclusive to members of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC); the village has 500 ground-level apartments available for postal workers to enjoy after they’ve delivered their final Oriental Trading catalog. Garden-style units start at just $374 a month, including water, sewage, trash removal, basic cable, maintenance, and use of all of the recreational facilities.

The idea for an affordable, profession-specific retirement community came to NALC president William Doherty in the 1950s, when he toured Europe and saw similar setups organized by labor unions, religious groups, and fraternal organizations [PDF]. He proposed the idea for U.S. mail carriers as early as 1954, then pounced when Congress passed a law in 1959 that provided loans to build housing for seniors. Doherty was there to break ground on July 1, 1962; Nalcrest officially opened for business less than two years later on January 20, 1964. The dedication ceremony included a band of mail carrier musicians and a separate group called “The Singing Mailmen,” a group made up of—you guessed it—singing mailmen, as well as a female water skiing team that proudly flew pennants spelling out “Nalcrest.” After a stint as the ambassador to Jamaica, Doherty himself retired to Nalcrest, living there until his death in 1987.

Though residents may not be traipsing a daily mail route anymore, they still have plenty of options to stay active. Nalcrest has shuffleboard, horseshoes, bocce, miniature golf, tennis courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, walking trails, and a softball diamond (home to the Nalcrest Eagles). It also boasts a travel club, a women’s association, and free art classes, among other activities. There’s one thing, however, it doesn’t have—dogs. With the exception of therapy dogs, Nalcrest has a no-canine rule in deference to retirees who were bitten in the line of duty and have an aversion to the animals.

If a dog-free community seems like paradise for postal workers, the other thing Nalcrest lacks cements its status as letter carrier nirvana: There are no mailboxes, because there is no home mail delivery. Each resident has to visit the Nalcrest post office to pick up any correspondence.

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