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11 Internet Tattoos

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While I may be a tattooed professional blogger, I’ve never been driven to get a tattoo of something related to the internet—especially given how fast things fizzle out online. These folks don’t seem to mind the short shelf-life of most websites, though. Here are 11 people with internet-related tattoos.

1. Reddit Star Wars

You knew someone out there had to have a Reddit tattoo. Well, in case you’re wondering, that person happens to be Fernando Takai and his Reddit logo is all decked out like a Jedi—making it way more fun and geeky than a regular Reddit alien would have been. Like practically everyone else on this list, he too works online.

2. Google It

Here’s a tattoo my boyfriend would love to have for all those times I ask him random questions that even Matt Soniak wouldn’t know off the top of his head. I don’t know who artist Mez Love tattooed this piece on, but I can’t help but wonder if the gentleman in question has a girlfriend who asks him weird, random questions as well.

3. Powered By Google

Josh Charland is a PC tech who knows just how important a good search engine is, which is why he wanted the world to know that everything in his life is Powered By Google.

4. iGoogle

Of course, Google isn’t just about searching for info on the web; it’s also about customizing and organizing the web to best suit your own personal interests. Perhaps that’s why IT pro Ivan Morrison wanted to adorn his right shoulder with the logo for Google’s personalized homepage, iGoogle.

5. Blogger

Violet Blue is a blogger specializing in human sexuality. She loves her job enough to actually get a tattoo of her job title.

6. WordPress

Ed Morita is a Hawaii-based blogger specializing in the topic of baking, which makes sense since he is also a skilled pastry chef. Like Violet, Ed wanted to celebrate his line of work with a tattoo and the end result is particularly nerdy, featuring the WordPress logo surrounded by a PC motherboard. For those who don’t know much about blogging, WordPress is one of the most popular blogging software options around.

7. RSS Headphones

Blogger Drew Olanoff is best known for his recent fight against cancer, but he is also well known for his tattoos. Why? Because he actually auctioned off the opportunity for someone to get their Twitter name tattooed on his arm –with all of the money donated to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. A year later, and after he battled cancer for himself, he auctioned off space on the other arm, this time donating money to the Livestrong Foundation.

Of course, while both of those are geeky and for great causes, I think it’s worth noting that even some of the tattoos he has gotten outside of charity auctions are still internet-related, like this RSS feed icon with headphones to represent his interest in podcasting.

8. Rackspace

Michael Long is a long-term employee of the Rackspace web hosting service. To prove his dedication to his company, he even got its logo tattooed on his left arm. Now that’s loyalty.

9. Threadless’ Cutter Fish

One of the most common arguments against tattoos is that if you like some artwork, you can always just get a tee shirt bearing the design and then you can remove it when you get tired of it. Of course, for true tattoo lovers, not only is that not enough, but sometimes they may even like a tee shirt design enough to get it tattooed on their bodies. For example, this Canadian gentleman who was tattooed with the image from Threadless’ Cutter Fish design.

10. Internets Love

Joe Stump is a web developer who has worked with eNotes.com, Digg and is co-founder of SimpleGeo. Given his career path, Joe clearly loves the interwebs—and he has the tattoo to prove it.

11. Internet

Rafael Rozendaal is a graphic artist who creates and designs websites, so it’s not all that surprising that he, too, loves the internet enough to get it inked on him.
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I didn’t see any mental_floss tattoos, but if any of you diehard fans out there decide to get one, let us know. We promise to feature you prominently in the inevitable sequel.

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Art
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts to Launch Mobile Interactive Art Museum
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Since not everyone in America has easy access to first-class culture, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts wants to bring it to them: As Smithsonian reports, the Richmond-based institution plans to launch an interactive mobile museum in fall 2018.

Called “VMFA on the Road,” the museum-on-wheels will visit rural schools, community centers, colleges, retirement homes, and small museums. At each stop, art lovers can enjoy lectures, distance learning opportunities, and rotating virtual reality tours of the museum's exhibitions.

The mobile museum is a modern offshoot of another VFMA initiative, the Artmobile, which was launched by the late architect and VMFA director Leslie Cheek Jr. From 1953 to 1994, the museum loaded tractor-trailers with works by artists like Monet, Rembrandt, and Picasso, and toured the state's remote areas to compensate for their lack of art institutions.

By the 1990s, the Artmobile program had swelled to include four high-tech Chevrolet tractor-trailers, each one laden with historic art treasures. Eventually, though, the VMFA discontinued its Artmobiles due to conservation and financial issues, including the challenges of protecting the artworks on the road.

As the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports, the VMFA's new traveling museum will be a specially designed, 53-foot Volvo tractor-trailer, paid for with corporate funds, foundation grants, and donations. It's been dubbed "Artmobile 2.0"—a fitting nickname for a high-tech take on a decades-old public service.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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Cephalopod Fossil Sketch in Australia Can Be Seen From Space

Australia is home to some of the most singular creatures alive today, but a new piece of outdoor art pays homage to an organism that last inhabited the continent 65 million years ago. As the Townsville Bulletin reports, an etching of a prehistoric ammonite has appeared in a barren field in Queensland.

Ammonites are the ancestors of the cephalopods that currently populate the world’s oceans. They had sharp beaks, dexterous tentacles, and spiraling shells that could grow more than 3 feet in diameter. The inland sea where the ammonites once thrived has since dried up, leaving only fossils as evidence of their existence. The newly plowed dirt mural acts as a larger-than-life reminder of the ancient animals.

To make a drawing big enough to be seen from space, mathematician David Kennedy plotted the image into a path consisting of more than 600 “way points.” Then, using a former World War II airfield as his canvas, the property’s owner Rob Ievers plowed the massive 1230-foot-by-820-foot artwork into the ground with his tractor.

The project was funded by Soil Science Australia, an organization that uses soil art to raise awareness of the importance of farming. The sketch doubles as a paleotourist attraction for the local area, which is home to Australia's "dinosaur trail" of museums and other fossil-related attractions. But to see the craftsmanship in all its glory, visitors will need to find a way to view it from above.

[h/t Townsville Bulletin]

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