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11 Internet Tattoos

While I may be a tattooed professional blogger, I’ve never been driven to get a tattoo of something related to the internet—especially given how fast things fizzle out online. These folks don’t seem to mind the short shelf-life of most websites, though. Here are 11 people with internet-related tattoos.

1. Reddit Star Wars

You knew someone out there had to have a Reddit tattoo. Well, in case you’re wondering, that person happens to be Fernando Takai and his Reddit logo is all decked out like a Jedi—making it way more fun and geeky than a regular Reddit alien would have been. Like practically everyone else on this list, he too works online.

2. Google It

Here’s a tattoo my boyfriend would love to have for all those times I ask him random questions that even Matt Soniak wouldn’t know off the top of his head. I don’t know who artist Mez Love tattooed this piece on, but I can’t help but wonder if the gentleman in question has a girlfriend who asks him weird, random questions as well.

3. Powered By Google

Josh Charland is a PC tech who knows just how important a good search engine is, which is why he wanted the world to know that everything in his life is Powered By Google.

4. iGoogle

Of course, Google isn’t just about searching for info on the web; it’s also about customizing and organizing the web to best suit your own personal interests. Perhaps that’s why IT pro Ivan Morrison wanted to adorn his right shoulder with the logo for Google’s personalized homepage, iGoogle.

5. Blogger

Violet Blue is a blogger specializing in human sexuality. She loves her job enough to actually get a tattoo of her job title.

6. WordPress

Ed Morita is a Hawaii-based blogger specializing in the topic of baking, which makes sense since he is also a skilled pastry chef. Like Violet, Ed wanted to celebrate his line of work with a tattoo and the end result is particularly nerdy, featuring the WordPress logo surrounded by a PC motherboard. For those who don’t know much about blogging, WordPress is one of the most popular blogging software options around.

7. RSS Headphones

Blogger Drew Olanoff is best known for his recent fight against cancer, but he is also well known for his tattoos. Why? Because he actually auctioned off the opportunity for someone to get their Twitter name tattooed on his arm –with all of the money donated to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. A year later, and after he battled cancer for himself, he auctioned off space on the other arm, this time donating money to the Livestrong Foundation.

Of course, while both of those are geeky and for great causes, I think it’s worth noting that even some of the tattoos he has gotten outside of charity auctions are still internet-related, like this RSS feed icon with headphones to represent his interest in podcasting.

8. Rackspace

Michael Long is a long-term employee of the Rackspace web hosting service. To prove his dedication to his company, he even got its logo tattooed on his left arm. Now that’s loyalty.

9. Threadless’ Cutter Fish

One of the most common arguments against tattoos is that if you like some artwork, you can always just get a tee shirt bearing the design and then you can remove it when you get tired of it. Of course, for true tattoo lovers, not only is that not enough, but sometimes they may even like a tee shirt design enough to get it tattooed on their bodies. For example, this Canadian gentleman who was tattooed with the image from Threadless’ Cutter Fish design.

10. Internets Love

Joe Stump is a web developer who has worked with eNotes.com, Digg and is co-founder of SimpleGeo. Given his career path, Joe clearly loves the interwebs—and he has the tattoo to prove it.

11. Internet

Rafael Rozendaal is a graphic artist who creates and designs websites, so it’s not all that surprising that he, too, loves the internet enough to get it inked on him.
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I didn’t see any mental_floss tattoos, but if any of you diehard fans out there decide to get one, let us know. We promise to feature you prominently in the inevitable sequel.

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Art
5 Things You Might Not Know About Ansel Adams

You probably know Ansel Adams—who was born on February 20, 1902—as the man who helped promote the National Park Service through his magnificent photographs. But there was a lot more to the shutterbug than his iconic, black-and-white vistas. Here are five lesser-known facts about the celebrated photographer.

1. AN EARTHQUAKE LED TO HIS DISTINCTIVE NOSE.

Adams was a four-year-old tot when the 1906 San Francisco earthquake struck his hometown. Although the boy managed to escape injury during the quake itself, an aftershock threw him face-first into a garden wall, breaking his nose. According to a 1979 interview with TIME, Adams said that doctors told his parents that it would be best to fix the nose when the boy matured. He joked, "But of course I never did mature, so I still have the nose." The nose became Adams' most striking physical feature. His buddy Cedric Wright liked to refer to Adams' honker as his "earthquake nose.

2. HE ALMOST BECAME A PIANIST.

Adams was an energetic, inattentive student, and that trait coupled with a possible case of dyslexia earned him the heave-ho from private schools. It was clear, however, that he was a sharp boy—when motivated.

When Adams was just 12 years old, he taught himself to play the piano and read music, and he quickly showed a great aptitude for it. For nearly a dozen years, Adams focused intensely on his piano training. He was still playful—he would end performances by jumping up and sitting on his piano—but he took his musical education seriously. Adams ultimately devoted over a decade to his study, but he eventually came to the realization that his hands simply weren't big enough for him to become a professional concert pianist. He decided to leave the keys for the camera after meeting photographer Paul Strand, much to his family's dismay.

3. HE HELPED CREATE A NATIONAL PARK.

If you've ever enjoyed Kings Canyon National Park in California, tip your cap to Adams. In the 1930s Adams took a series of photographs that eventually became the book Sierra Nevada: The John Muir Trail. When Adams sent a copy to Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, the cabinet member showed it to Franklin Roosevelt. The photographs so delighted FDR that he wouldn't give the book back to Ickes. Adams sent Ickes a replacement copy, and FDR kept his with him in the White House.

After a few years, Ickes, Adams, and the Sierra Club successfully convinced Roosevelt to make Kings Canyon a national park in 1940. Roosevelt's designation specifically provided that the park be left totally undeveloped and roadless, so the only way FDR himself would ever experience it was through Adams' lenses.

4. HE WELCOMED COMMERCIAL ASSIGNMENTS.

While many of his contemporary fine art photographers shunned commercial assignments as crass or materialistic, Adams went out of his way to find paying gigs. If a company needed a camera for hire, Adams would generally show up, and as a result, he had some unlikely clients. According to The Ansel Adams Gallery, he snapped shots for everyone from IBM to AT&T to women's colleges to a dried fruit company. All of this commercial print work dismayed Adams's mentor Alfred Stieglitz and even worried Adams when he couldn't find time to work on his own projects. It did, however, keep the lights on.

5. HE AND GEORGIA O'KEEFFE WERE FRIENDS.

Adams and legendary painter O'Keeffe were pals and occasional traveling buddies who found common ground despite their very different artistic approaches. They met through their mutual friend/mentor Stieglitz—who eventually became O'Keeffe's husband—and became friends who traveled throughout the Southwest together during the 1930s. O'Keeffe would paint while Adams took photographs.

These journeys together led to some of the artists' best-known work, like Adams' portrait of O'Keeffe and a wrangler named Orville Cox, and while both artists revered nature and the American Southwest, Adams considered O'Keeffe the master when it came to capturing the area. 

“The Southwest is O’Keeffe’s land,” he wrote. “No one else has extracted from it such a style and color, or has revealed the essential forms so beautifully as she has in her paintings.”

The two remained close throughout their lives. Adams would visit O'Keeffe's ranch, and the two wrote to each other until Adams' death in 1984.

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Dan Bell
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Design
A Cartographer Is Mapping All of the UK’s National Parks, J.R.R. Tolkien-Style
Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park
Dan Bell

Cartographer Dan Bell makes national parks into fantasy lands. Bell, who lives near Lake District National Park in England, is currently on a mission to draw every national park in the UK in the style of the maps in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Kottke.org reports.

The project began in September 2017, when Bell posted his own hand-drawn version of a Middle Earth map online. He received such a positive response that he decided to apply the fantasy style to real world locations. He has completed 11 out of the UK’s 15 parks so far. Once he finishes, he hopes to tackle the U.S. National Park system, too. (He already has Yellowstone National Park down.)

Bell has done various other maps in the same style, including ones for London and Game of Thrones’s Westeros, and he commissions, in case you have your own special locale that could use the Tolkien treatment. Check out a few of his park maps below.

A close-up of a map for Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park in central England
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Cairngorms National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Cairngorms National Park in Scotland
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Lake District National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Lake District National Park in England
Dan Bell

You can buy prints of the maps here.

[h/t Kottke.org]

All images by Dan Bell

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