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The Late Movies: Paul Simon's Concert in Central Park, 21 Years Later

Twenty-one years ago today, Paul Simon put on a massive concert in Central Park. The performance on August 15, 1991 focused on material from his albums Graceland and Rhythm of the Saints, plus an assortment of greatest hits of his previous work, including Simon & Garfunkel material...but without Garfunkel. The resulting double album has been required listening in my house for the following two+ decades. Of course, Simon's 1991 Concert in the Park wasn't his first Central Park blowout -- way back in 1981 he and Garfunkel did a reunion show that led to the album The Concert in Central Park. Confused yet? Good.

Tonight, let's take a look and listen to some notable moments from the 1991 performance. Although you often hear estimates of 600,000-750,000 people in attendance, recent reviews seem to debunk those figures, suggesting attendance on the lawn could have been only 100,000 tops. Oh well, it's still a huge concert.

"The Obvious Child"

The opening song in the concert, with a killer beat and some killer-diller vintage 1991 clothes. Simon's outfit has aged reasonably well, but I can't say the same about the trumpet player's green/orange/purple button-down shirt.

"You Can Call Me Al" With and Without Chevy Chase

First up, the version that appeared on the concert album, minus Chevy Chase (presumably due to a few vocal flubs -- Chevy has the tendency to do that to a man). Trivia: on the studio version, the bass solo's second half is actually a reversed tape of the first half...making it a tricky thing to play live. The live solo appears here at about 4:14 and is a masterful piece of bass work. Anyway, without Chevy:

And with Chevy (distinctly more awesome). I'm guessing this was an encore? Anyone at the concert remember how they got away with playing the same song twice?

"The Boxer"

Compare this with the Simon & Garfunkel version from 10 years earlier. I like this one much better, but your mileage may vary.

"Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes"

The video quality here is a bit rough, but the soul comes through. "I mean everybody here would know exactly what I'm talking about!" (Crowd roars.)

"Bridge Over Troubled Water"

Simon attempts "Bridge" without Garfunkel. I think this works, but it's really not the same. Compare to the 1981 version featuring Garfunkel -- Art absolutely nails it, and it literally gives me chills.

"Graceland"

It holds up.

"Me & Julio Down By the Schoolyard"

The extra percussion really works on this one, as dusk falls over New York City. Interestingly, Simon completely messed up the whistling around 1:30 (you can see him grimace at his bandmates after the first flub); on the album proper whistling is overdubbed.

"The Sound of Silence"

"Hello darkness, my old friend." This track closes the show. Compare (if you dare) to a performance by Simon & Garfunkel in Madison Square Garden in 2009.

This is Not on DVD

This concert was never released on DVD, though VHS, Laserdisc, and audio-only versions are out there. A Facebook group wants to change that. Maybe enough Likes will change whatever contract is holding back this release?

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Chloe Efforn
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Animals
John Lennon Was a Crazy Cat Lady
Chloe Efforn
Chloe Efforn

John Lennon was crazy about cats, and though he owned a couple of dogs (Sally and Bernard) over the years, he was better known for getting by with a little help from his feline friends.

1. ELVIS

Growing up, Lennon's beloved mother, Julia, had a named cat after Elvis Presley, whom Julia and John were both crazy about. The Lennons later realized they had misnamed Elvis when "he" gave birth to a litter of kittens in the cupboard, but they didn't change the cat's name based on that small mistake.

2. AND 3. TICH AND SAM

He had two other cats as a boy growing up in Liverpool: Tich and Sam. Tich passed away while Lennon was away at art school (which he attended from 1957 to 1960), and Sam was named after famous British diarist Samuel Pepys

4. TIM

One day, John Lennon found a stray cat in the snow, which his Aunt Mimi allowed him to keep. (John's Aunt Mimi raised him from a young boy through his late teenage years, and he affectionately referred to her as the Cat Woman.) He named the marmalade-colored half-Persian cat Tim.

Tim remained a special favorite of John's. Every day, he would hop on his Raleigh bicycle and ride to Mr. Smith's, the local fishmonger, where he would buy a few pieces of fish for Tim and his other cats. Even after John became famous as a Beatle, he would often call and check in on how Tim was doing. Tim lived a happy life and survived to celebrate his 20th birthday.

5. AND 6. MIMI AND BABAGHI

John and his first wife, Cynthia, had a cat named Mimi who was, of course, named after his Aunt Mimi. They soon got another cat, a tabby who they dubbed Babaghi. John and Cynthia continued acquiring more cats, eventually owning around 10 of them.

7. JESUS

As a Beatle, John had a cat named Jesus. The name was most likely John's sarcastic response to his "the Beatles are bigger than Jesus" controversy of 1966. But he wasn't the only band member with a cat named Jesus: Paul McCartney once had a trio of kittens named Jesus, Mary, and Joseph.

8. AND 9. MAJOR AND MINOR

In the mid-1970s, John had an affair with his secretary, May Pang. One day, the studio receptionist brought a box of kittens into the recording studio where John and May were. "No," John immediately told May, "we can't, we're traveling too much." But she picked up one of the kittens and put it over her shoulder. Then John started stroking the kitten and decided to keep it. At the end of the day, the only other kitten left was a little white one that was so loud no one else wanted it. So they adopted it as well and named the pair Major and Minor.

10. AND 11. SALT AND PEPPER

John owned a pair of black and white cats with his wife Yoko Ono. As befitting John's offbeat sense of humor, many places report he christened the white cat Pepper and the black one Salt.

12. AND 13. GERTRUDE AND ALICE

John and Yoko also had two Russian Blue cats named Gertrude and Alice, who each met tragic ends. After a series of sicknesses, Gertrude was diagnosed with a virus that could become dangerous to their young son, Sean. John later said that he held Gertrude and wept as she was euthanized. 

Later, Alice jumped out of an open window in the Lennons' high-rise apartment at the Dakota and plunged to her death. Sean was present at the time of the accident, and he remembers it as the only time he ever saw his father cry.

14., 15. AND 16. MISHA, SASHA, AND CHARO

In later years, John also owned three cats he named Misha, Sasha, and Charo. Always an artist at heart, John loved to sketch his many cats, and he used some of these pictures as illustrations in his books.

This piece originally ran in 2012.

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entertainment
The Time Sammy Davis Jr. Impersonated Michael Jackson
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Getty Images

Sammy Davis Jr. was known for his impersonations—check out his rendition of “As Time Goes By” as 13 different people. So when he hit the stage with Jerry Lewis for a 1988 TV special, he decided to show the audience that his talents weren’t just limited to acts from his era.

Though he briefly mentions Rod Stewart, his main target was Michael Jackson. Davis and Jackson were extremely close; when Jackson was just in his twenties, he would often show up at Davis’s house unannounced to immerse himself in the archives, a room downstairs that contained videos of Davis’s performances over the years.

“Michael Jackson is more than a friend," Davis—who was born on this day in 1925—explained, while also alluding to the fact that the King of Pop borrowed some dance moves from him. "He’s like a son.” And then he launched into this impression:

Jackson returned the favor during a special on February 4, 1990, in which Hollywood’s biggest stars gathered to honor Davis, who was celebrating six decades in show business:

Sadly, the anniversary show was the last time Davis would perform in public. Though throat cancer had mostly stolen his voice by this point, Davis let his tap shoes do the talking. He died on May 16, 1990—just three months after the tribute aired.

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